What Are You Reading 4

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Jul 27, 2008
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We moved three years ago and we bought our new house, and put in a reading room /library, same deal with floor to ceiling shelves. You think it'll be enough but amazing how quick you can fill them. We do have shelves in other rooms but we are near capacity as well. Time for another bigger house
Or just a big extention saves, all the hassle of moving.
 
Nov 21, 2010
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Reading 'The Body: A Guide for Occupants' by Bill Bryson
 

=Tamar

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May 20, 2012
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Just finished: Akata Witch (c.2011), by Nnedi Okorafor. Excellent book, first in a series but comes to a reasonable stopping place. If I find the next volume I'll try it. The next one is Akata Warrior.
 

pip

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Sep 3, 2010
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Just finished: Akata Witch (c.2011), by Nnedi Okorafor. Excellent book, first in a series but comes to a reasonable stopping place. If I find the next volume I'll try it. The next one is Akata Warrior.
I recently finished Binti by Okorafor as well. Good writer so may try out that series at some point.
 

pip

Sergeant-at-Arms
Sep 3, 2010
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Starting Shadows of Self by Brandon Sanderson, its the 2 part of the second Mistborn series and the second set has a bit of a wild west feel.
 

RathDarkblade

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City Watch
Mar 24, 2015
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I just finished reading Azazel, by Isaac Asimov. A selection of amusing (if somewhat old-fashioned) short stories, based on the "be careful what you wish for" theme. These must be read to be (dis)believed. ;)

Among them are the man who wished he could fly, in order to prove the Bible is wrong about angels; the lady sculptor who wished her (anatomically correct) statue to come to life, for she loved him so much; the young man who was unsuccessful with women, so he wished for a pheromone boost ... and so on.

What on earth could go wrong? :) Read it and find out ...
 
Jul 27, 2008
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Rath I have that in my collection just not got around to reading it yet, and also his Magic the final fantasy collection.
Just finished Mindjacked book 4 in the Cyberpunk city series book 5 is out next month so in the meantime I'm reading The future of another Timeline -Annalee Newitz so far not as good as her last one Autonomous.
 

RathDarkblade

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City Watch
Mar 24, 2015
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Before that one, I read "You Find Him -- I'll Fix Him" by James Hadley Chase. :confused:

It was recommended to me as being like Raymond Chandler's books. I didn't think much of it, though; it had none of Chandler's thoughtful descriptions or wonderful metaphors -- but it did have action, and plenty of it. (Think of it as the literary equivalent of a James Bond film -- i.e. the hero fights for his life, the hero is nearly beaten, but he's up again, huzzah ... the hero gets the girl, hooray. And so on).

If that's your cup of tea, you're welcome. It wasn't mine. *shrug*
 

Quatermass

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Dec 7, 2010
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Actually, the literary James Bond goes through the wringer at times. You know the sequence at the end of Dr No where he crawls through the ventilation system? In the book, this is actually part of an obstacle course designed by Dr No to determine human limits to pain and endurance. At the end of it, Bond's pretty beat up, and that's before he faces off against the giant squid.

That being said, the literary James Bond, while more complex than his cinematic counterpart, is also a rather unpleasant fellow, even compared to his cinematic version. So were the books. They may be thrilling reads, but they're also very badly dated, to put it very politely.
 

RathDarkblade

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City Watch
Mar 24, 2015
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Fair enough, Quatermass. :) I was comparing the book to a James Bond film, though. I haven't read the books.

When you say the books are badly dated, what do you mean, exactly? Are they (say) sexist/racist, etc.?

Even if they are -- well -- I don't understand the issue. Fleming was writing for the audience of his time. So did Raymond Chandler, or Dickens, or W. S. Gilbert or Mark Twain -- and they all used language and situations that many people nowadays would find objectionable.

But, again: so what?

I've heard of some pressure groups who say that we should ban Dickens, or Gilbert, or what have you. But I think that's nonsense. Why? Let's see ...

- Chandler uses dated language to refer to gays, blacks, and women.
- Dickens uses offensive language about Fagin (and Jews).
- W. S. Gilbert uses the N-word twice (once in "Princess Ida", and once in "The MIkado". Though, to be fair, these were both expunged).
- Mark Twain uses the N-word in "Huckleberry Finn".
- Jonathan Swift describes tiny people in "Gulliver's Travels". (Oh noes! It might be offensive to people with dwarfism!) :rolleyes:

Should we ban them all? Then let's ban "Crime and Punishment", because Raskolnikov kills a woman. (Aah, he killed someone! Aaaah!) And let's ban -- ooh, I don't know -- "Robinson Crusoe", because he refers to cannibalism. (Aaaah! The sky is falling!)

Yes, I'm being ridiculous. But I hope the point is made. :)
 
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Penfold

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Dec 29, 2009
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The character of Bond, in the books, was a rather unpleasant bigoted racist, misogynistic alcoholic and I think that the point Q was making is that Bond makes for a very unusual type of hero rather than that the books should be banned. :)
 

Catch-up

Sergeant-at-Arms
Jul 26, 2008
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I'm about halfway through Shakespeare for Squirrels by Christopher Moore and really enjoying it. I'm also doing some required reading (these two words should never be put together) for the local non-profit on whose board I now find myself. WTF? I've been so good at saying no to things lately. Seems I need more practice. Anyway, one is called the Art of Peace and the other is a book about activism and how to organize.
 

RathDarkblade

Moderator
City Watch
Mar 24, 2015
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The character of Bond, in the books, was a rather unpleasant bigoted racist, misogynistic alcoholic and I think that the point Q was making is that Bond makes for a very unusual type of hero rather than that the books should be banned. :)
Fair enough. :) I'm not accusing Q of saying that -- only that I've heard some groups saying it. For instance, when some theatrical group stages "The Mikado" every so often, there's some group that says "Ban The Mikado! It's offensive to the Japanese." :confused:

It really depends on how the play is staged, though. Some theatre groups create Japanese caricatures, which is obviously inadvisable. But "The Mikado" itself is a parody of the British class system (and funny to boot). So it makes no sense to ban it. :(
 
Jul 27, 2008
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Stirlingshire, Scotland
I have put down The future of another Timeline -Annalee Newitz for a little while and started reading another Cyberpunk one , Cyber Witch - Eddie R Hicks the blurb:
in the year 2082, the neon-lit city of Los Angeles is home to the largest community of witches and warlocks in the world.
 

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