Differences between Death in Good Omens and in Discworld

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#1
What do you think is behing his prsonality difference in the books ( apart from Neil co-writing!) I think that mabe it took place before mort, when he had little to do with humans or he was shaped by what we believe. Opinions please
 

Tonyblack

Super Moderator
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Jul 25, 2008
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#2
Death is a bit like Data from Star Trek TNG - the more he interacts with humans the more human-like he becomes. Humanity has become an interest to him and that interest has become contagious. We see him in the various books trying to understand human emotions and the human way of thinking because humans are his job.

I think there's something in one of the books that says something like a rat catcher will, as he learns about the rats he kills, become fascinated in them and eventually may even become a little rat-like. It goes beyond a job and becomes an interest and then a passion.

If I remember correctly, when the rat catcher in Maskerade dies, the Death of Rats comes for him.

So Death becomes more human-like as the books progress and he has more contact and takes a greater interest in humans. :)
 

Trish

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Apr 23, 2009
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#3
Tony is correct; the more DEATH ineracts with humans, the more fascinated he becomes with us.

DEATH is always all about the the Duty and takes it seriously.
In Good Omens, he is doing his job.

Even when DEATH transfers to a new department (Hogfather), he makes sure human souls will be collected.
 

chris.ph

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Aug 12, 2008
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#4
homo sapiens have been around for about 100 000 years i think he knows us by now. plus there maybe more than one personification of death on different planets,dimensions and realities :eek:
 

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