Thief of Time

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sparky

New Member
May 15, 2009
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#1
:laugh: I'm about a third of the way through this book and am finding it one of Sir Terry's more complicated books to follow because of all the different threads (that surely must all come together at the end) that have to be followed. But it is still very funny ! I do love Jeremy Clockson ! Does anyone else agree ?
 

Tonyblack

Super Moderator
City Watch
Jul 25, 2008
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#2
Hi there sparky! :laugh:

Thief of Time is a really good book - and yes, things do become clearer - and also very exciting. ;)

I think you may be in for a surprise with Jeremy in the end. It is a complicated book, but well worth the effort.

Welcome to the site. :laugh:
 

Dotsie

Sergeant-at-Arms
Jul 28, 2008
8,828
73
2,850
#4
Welcome Sparky :)

I've only read Thief of Time once. It wasn't one of my favourites, but I think I'll have another go.
 
Oct 13, 2008
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Devon
#7
Hi Sparky :) Welcome to the forum.
I like Susan.
 
Jul 25, 2008
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#9
Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit said:
The threads Do eventually come together. It is the one where Susan COMES INTO HER OWN, lol, realizing that Death is Really her grandfather and tries desperatly to deny and ignore it.
I agree that the threads in this book do eventually come together--and there are multiple threads in this book. I would identify the four major threads as the Lobsang/LuTze thread, the Jeremy/Igor thread, the Susan thread and the DEATH thread but they intertwine and one could make a case for still more threads.

However, I'm totally puzzled by your last sentence, and have finally decided that you are probably confusing Susan in Soul Music (her first appearance and function as a substitute Death)and Susan in Thief of Time. But your statement that this is when she realizes that Death really is her grandfather makes no sense--she always has known that he was her grandfather (from the time she went to visit him as a small child and thought all grandfathers had bony knees and wore black robes). She resents, to some extent, the fact that DEATH expects her to "drop everything" and come help him in this book, But she certainly doesn't try to deny their special relationship nor does his use of her to do something he cannot do come as a surprise to her.

And by the way, Sparky, Welcome to the Board. :laugh: I hope you enjoy this book--it's one of my favorites :) , but it certainly takes more than one reading.
 
#10
I suppose it comes from my last reading of Hogfather. She has vague memories of visiting him as a young child and remembers her parents stopped taking her there before they died, because they thought it would twist her point of view... let me find the reference. Well, first I must find the blasted book hehe, I keep re-reading them and setting them in unexpected places...thyroid issues make ones' memory a bit wonky.
 

sparky

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May 15, 2009
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#12
Thank you for all your replies - and yes, this book was well worth the effort and the twist with Jeremy was very good ! will be one of the books I will re-read in the future. Am in the middle of The Colour of Magic at the moment for a bit of light relief :laugh: I do love the books with the three witches in them, especially Nanny Ogg ! :laugh:
 

Foul ole Ron

Lance-Constable
Jun 5, 2009
18
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2,150
#13
My favourite discworld book so far.

I'm reading them in order & have just finished this one.

It's very funny, I also love the character of Lu-Tze, but most of all I love the ideas behind this one.
 
Jul 25, 2008
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#14
Foul ole Ron said:
My favourite discworld book so far.

I'm reading them in order & have just finished this one.

It's very funny, I also love the character of Lu-Tze, but most of all I love the ideas behind this one.
Welcome to the forum, Ron! Are you going on to the Last Hero, or skipping to Nightwatch? I really found the former a bit tiresome, though the illustrations are interesting. But Nightwatch is a real tour de force and gives you more of Lu-Tze. It also connects nicely with Thief of Time.
 

Foul ole Ron

Lance-Constable
Jun 5, 2009
18
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#15
swreader said:
Foul ole Ron said:
My favourite discworld book so far.

I'm reading them in order & have just finished this one.

It's very funny, I also love the character of Lu-Tze, but most of all I love the ideas behind this one.
Welcome to the forum, Ron! Are you going on to the Last Hero, or skipping to Nightwatch? I really found the former a bit tiresome, though the illustrations are interesting. But Nightwatch is a real tour de force and gives you more of Lu-Tze. It also connects nicely with Thief of Time.
Good question.

I have the Last Hero as an audiobook only so I'm not going to appreciate the illustrations obviously.

Does it stand up in it's own right?

I do like the character of Cohen the Barbarian very much & enjoyed Interesting Times a lot but I see it's short novel rather than the usual length.

I may listen to the audiobook in the car & leave Nightwatch to read.
 

sparky

New Member
May 15, 2009
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#16
The Colour of Magic

Love this book - must have read it many times - one of my favourite quotes (although I could quote the whole book) is "At the top of the cellar steps Broadman knelt down and fumbled in his tinderbox. It turned out to be damp. 'I'll kill that bloody cat,' he muttered, and groped for the spare box that was normally on the ledge by the door. It was missing. Broadman said a bad word."

Makes me laugh out loud everytime I read it. I think its because there are all these very magical characters, who use the language of us normal (?) human beings and it makes for very funny juxtopositions.

What do you think makes Sir Terry's books so funny ?
 

Tonyblack

Super Moderator
City Watch
Jul 25, 2008
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#17
Great quote sparky, but I think that's from Colour of Magic rather than Thief of Time. :)
 

FatRat

New Member
Jun 4, 2009
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#18
Foul ole Ron said:
I have the Last Hero as an audiobook only so I'm not going to appreciate the illustrations obviously.

Does it stand up in it's own right?

I do like the character of Cohen the Barbarian very much & enjoyed Interesting Times a lot but I see it's short novel rather than the usual length.

I may listen to the audiobook in the car & leave Nightwatch to read.
erm yes and no the story is good and it has some great dialogue but you really do need to see the pictures to appreciate it. i suppose its the diffrence between reading a movie script, and seeing the movie if you get my drift.
 

The rat

Lance-Corporal
Apr 18, 2009
247
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Bad Blintz
#19
I really like this one, and has been stated manyn time a lot to digest in the number of threads that Terry took one, but is put together very nicely and seamlessly ***hint hint***!

What I really like about it is Briggs narration on the audio book. I work the nice shift and I listen to these as I work on my computer and Brigg's Lut-Ze is just hilarious!

I downloaded them to my old iPod, but when I got my iPod Touch for some reason all the tracks get jumbled. I tried downloading it from Audibles.com, but they do not have it for the US market. I need to request them to make it avalible for US customers!

Great book! Both in written and spoken form!
 

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