SPOILERS Discussion of Good Omens, the series

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RathDarkblade

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All right ... so I didn't put that interpretation on it. OK.

Still, he doesn't covet his neighbour's wife! A-ha! So he doesn't break all of the Ten Commandments! ;) Also, he doesn't take God's name in vain, and he doesn't bear false witness (unless the way I remember things is way off...) ;)
 

=Tamar

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P.S. His cufflinks are a pair of lyres.
 

RathDarkblade

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...Um. That's not any evidence of breaking any Commandment or any of the Seven Deadly Sins, surely? :) Quite the opposite. Music is supposed to be a pleasure unto any deity. The Bible (or at least the Old Testament) is full of examples of various people singing and playing musical instruments to show both joy and sadness.
 

Dotsie

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All right ... so I didn't put that interpretation on it. OK.

Still, he doesn't covet his neighbour's wife! A-ha! So he doesn't break all of the Ten Commandments! ;) Also, he doesn't take God's name in vain, and he doesn't bear false witness (unless the way I remember things is way off...) ;)
He does lie to Heaven, and definitely lies to Shadwell about the number of nipples the antichrist has (oodles).
 

Dotsie

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Music is supposed to be a pleasure unto any deity.
Only apparently if it's Elgar or Liszt. This is one of several areas in which Crowley manages to successfully tempt Aziraphale. Anyway, the pair of lyres is a pun due to all that bearing false witness the two keep doing.
 
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There's been some discussion of the coin-tossing scene in 1601, while watching Hamlet.
You can't always believe what the director and author say afterwards... they both seem to think that Aziraphale doesn't know Crowley cheated on the coin toss, but violetfaust posted (quoted by joan-daardvark) on tumblr that it's clear from Aziraphale's face that he knows darned well, but he doesn't care. Violetfaust says that the meeting at the Globe was set up when the two hadn't seen each other for a while, so it couldn't have been for the arrangement. It had to have been the chance to hang out together for four hours in what they expected to be a crowd. They do each other's work anyway so it doesn't matter who wins the toss.

But I'm not sure I agree. Although they didn't specifically know that they both had a job in the same place, they seem to have been kept fairly busy so it was a good bet that they had something they could trade off. I think a more likely reason for wanting to have one person do both was to let one of them get out of having to ride a horse, as neither likes that mode of transportation. The face Aziraphale makes when he loses the toss could mean he knows he was cheated but it could just be a grimace at having to ride a horse all that way. Violetfaust does make a good point in the closing comment, that Crowley's agreeing to make Hamlet a hit had more to do with arranging another date, which would be more likely to have a crowd they could hide among for the full four-hour-long play.
 
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P.S. joan-daardvark has posted a (so far) three-part discussion of the use of the words "play", "game" and "real" in the Series, Good Omens. (as opposed to the Novel, Script, or 1991 movie-that-wasn't)
It shows how carefully that script was written.
Part 1 meta

Part 2 meta

Part 3 meta
 
May 20, 2012
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Crowley's medallion: One of the latest Behind The scenes pictures shows Crowley wearing a medallion, as well as his usual gold chain and neck scarf. It has been yanked out of his shirt to make sure it showed. I don't recall seeing it in the Series as televised, so I am assuming it was a detail they decided not to use. Still, it is interesting as a design choice. It looks to me like a sand dollar with some black fabric around the edges. The sand dollar has a full-fledged Christian myth about it, with holes as wounds, a flower-like shape on the top, and when broken open, five tiny bonelike structures that resemble a sketchy drawing of flying doves (doves because they're white).
The images can be found on apple-duty.
 

Penfold

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Something I just realized (and can't remember it being discussed before) is that when they 'do lunch' Azriphale is the only one who appears to be eating (or has just eaten). Crowley is neither seen eating nor has he any place settings in front of him other than a glass of wine.

I have no idea whether this has any significance or not.
 
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In the Novel, it's canon that Crowley eats: he sleeps, "especially after a heavy meal". In the Series, you are right, he is not shown eating. He does have popcorn when he is in the theatre watching cartoons, and he takes the popcorn with him when he dashes out after Hastur tells him they're coming for him, but we don't see him eating any popcorn. He might have bought it as part of the routine of going to the movies, but why would he do that?
My head-canon is that he does occasionally eat.
ETA: He also routinely buys ice pops in the park. Presumably he tastes them.
 
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I watched Good Omens on DVD, all of the series, I have the DVD. I had already read the book, now I am watching the episodes on BBC2. I loved the story & my Daughter, not a TP fan, watched it with me, amazingly she loves it too.
I am not into dissecting every scene or passing comments on the production, I am not interested in doing that, I just enjoyed it as a film & now as a series. It is well made, the graphics at the begining & end, special effects are amazing & I loved the way it was filmed. The actors, all off them are brilliant.
 

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