Nac Mac Feegles

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tanwir

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May 3, 2014
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#1
What British dialect do the Nac Mac Feegles speak? Can it be connected to one dialect or a mixture of two or more?
 

Tonyblack

Super Moderator
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Jul 25, 2008
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#2
Hi tanwir and welcome to the site. :)

They seem to have a Scottish accent - but pinning it down to a particular part of Scotland isn't so easy.
 
Jan 23, 2014
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#3
I tend to read it as Glaswegian. But it isn't.
 
Jul 27, 2008
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Stirlingshire, Scotland
#4
There is a bit of weegie and general lowland Scots in it as Terry did spend some time there in weegieland to get an idea of the dialect. :mrgreen:
 

tanwir

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May 3, 2014
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#5
So what happens when Terry's books are translated into other languages. It wouldn't make sense to retain a Glasgow accent. What would a German Nac Mac Feegle sound like for example?
 
Jul 27, 2008
17,594
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Stirlingshire, Scotland
#7
tanwir said:
So what happens when Terry's books are translated into other languages. It wouldn't make sense to retain a Glasgow accent. What would a German Nac Mac Feegle sound like for example?
Exactly the same, as there are no Feegles in Germany or any other country. ;) :mrgreen:
 

Mixa

Corporal
Jan 1, 2014
872
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Barcelona, Catalonia
#12
tanwir said:
So what happens when Terry's books are translated into other languages. It wouldn't make sense to retain a Glasgow accent. What would a German Nac Mac Feegle sound like for example?
Well, I don't know what the Germans did, but the Spanish translators found a great solution for the Feegles' accent: they made them speak Galician, the language of Galicia (because the Spanish principal language is Castilian but there are other languages such as the Galician, Basque and Catalan).

Here you can hear the difference between Castilian and Galician:


Castilian monologue


Galician monologue


For me it's still difficult to understand the original Feegles, but the Spanish ones are hilarious! :mrgreen:

Mx
 

The Mad Collector

Sergeant-at-Arms
Sep 1, 2010
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Ironbridge UK
www.bearsonthesquare.com
#13
A very sensible solution there Mixa. Which suggests that other translators may also have picked on a regional accent or dialect to interpret the Feegles.

Do Dutch Feegles speak Frisian? German Feegles have maybe a Bavarian accent...
 
Jul 27, 2008
17,594
549
3,400
Stirlingshire, Scotland
#16
Mixa said:
tanwir said:
So what happens when Terry's books are translated into other languages. It wouldn't make sense to retain a Glasgow accent. What would a German Nac Mac Feegle sound like for example?
Well, I don't know what the Germans did, but the Spanish translators found a great solution for the Feegles' accent: they made them speak Galician, the language of Galicia (because the Spanish principal language is Castilian but there are other languages such as the Galician, Basque and Catalan).

Here you can hear the difference between Castilian and Galician:


Castilian monologue


Galician monologue


For me it's still difficult to understand the original Feegles, but the Spanish ones are hilarious! :mrgreen:

Mx
Mixa, You can tell he is a Galician Feegle, because of his nearly Tartan tie. ;) :laugh:
 

RathDarkblade

Moderator
City Watch
Mar 24, 2015
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Melbourne, Victoria
#19
In Germany they used a quite streety German but not a special accent.
Hmm. I may only be a "darn'd furriner", but I can't imagine how a "streety" London accent might sound. Are you referring to Cockney, Tony? The cockney sound (associated with Bow Bells and the East End) always sounded rather "streety" to me -- I hope I'm right? ;)
 

Tonyblack

Super Moderator
City Watch
Jul 25, 2008
29,755
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Cardiff, Wales
#20
Partly yes, with Cockney. But there are rules about being a "true Cockney". You have to have been born within the sound of "Bow Bells". That means the bells of St Mary-le-Bow, in Cheapside, London. But there are dialects all over the UK that have certain words and phrases unique to them.
 

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